No-Evidence MSJ in a Modification Upheld: Opinions, Oct. 27, 2017

The Fourteenth Court of Appeals released a memorandum opinion in In re A.J.L. and V.C.L., No 14-16-00834-CV, affirming the trial court’s granting of a no-evidence MSJ in a modification.

Mother and father divorced in 2010. In 2013, the order was modified. In August, 2014, the mother sued to modify the 2013 order; father counter-petitioned.  The father also filed a motion for traditional and no-evidence summary judgment, apparently arguing mother’s motion to modify failed to assert how there had been a material and substantial change in the circumstances of the child. The no-evidence MSJ was granted and the mother appealed, arguing the MSJ was legally insufficient.

In her first  argument, mother alleged father’s MSJ was deficient because it included a reference to Tex. Fam. Code 156.101(1) instead of 156.101(a)(1). The COA disagreed, finding such a typo was not fatal, and overruled the issue.

In her second argument, the mother claimed that the father’s motion referenced the wrong timeframe. That is, father’s MSJ asserted that mother had no evidence of a material and substantial change since the trial court’s 2013 order. The mother argued that because the 2013 order was based on an MSA, it should be from the signing of the MSA to the filing of mother’s counter-petition, as sections 156.101(a)(1) and 156.401(a-1) require evidence of a material and substantial change “since the earlier of… the date of the rendition of the order… or the date of the signing of a mediated… settlement agreement on which the order is based.” This, mother argued, showed father failed to move for no-evidence summary judgment  on “one or more essential elements of a claim or defense” as required by TRCP 166a(i). The COA disagreed, finding that though father’s motion should have more accurately reflected the statute, it declined to hold that father’s no-evidence motion was legally insufficient on this ground. Father’s motion included the full text of section 156.101(a)(1) and incorporated the text into the challenged element by asserting that the mother had no evidence of a material or substantial change of circumstances “as contemplated by Texas Family Code section 156.101(1).” This, the COA found, was sufficient.

In her second issue, the mother argued the trial court erred in granting the no-evidence MSJ because the record evidence raised a genuine issue of material fact as to whether there was a material and substantial change and whether the proposed changes were in the best interest of the children. Father argued the mother failed to present evidence sufficient to show this.

In response to father’s motion, mother filed a response which included 114 pages of exhibits, which included copies of pleadings, mother’s interrogatory responses, father’s responses to RFDs, two affidavits from mother’s attorney, and mother’s affidavit with five attached exhibits. In her response, mother’s substantive response to father’s no-evidence MSJ consisted of the following paragraph:

Petitioner claims a genuine issue of material fact exists as to whether a
material and substantial change in circumstances has occurred and
submits affidavits, discovery, documentary evidence and Petitioner’s
pleadings, as summary judgment evidence, referenced in an appendix
attached hereto, filed with this response and incorporated by such
reference for all purposes as if recited verbatim herein.

As the COA stated, “Mother did not cite, quote, or otherwise point out to the trial court the evidence she relied on to create a fact issue on the challenged elements, in any portion of her response.” By failing to specifically identify the supporting proof, mother’s response failed to identify a fact issue to defeat summary judgment.

As such, the COA found the trial court did not err in granting the no-evidence MSJ and affirmed the trial court.

 

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